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January 16, 2018

Book Notes - Steph Post "Walk In The Fire"

Walk In The Fire

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Walk In The Fire is yet another engaging Florida noir novel from Steph Post.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Post combines classical genre tropes with a touch of Harry Crews–style Southern gothic in this terrific crime novel."


In her own words, here is Steph Post's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Walk In The Fire:



This will be my third time creating a playlist for a novel and I’m having some trouble with it. Not so much with creating the soundtrack for Walk In The Fire, the sequel to last year’s Lightwood and continuation of the Cannon family saga, but with presenting it. Being the middle novel of a trilogy, Walk In The Fire is, by its nature, a story of transition. Our two main characters, Judah and Ramey, have their world rocked by the end of the very first chapter and from that point on I considered anything to be fair game when it came to setting trials for the Cannons, Sister Tulah and Clive Grant, a new addition to the story. All that goes to say that Walk In The Fire is rife with spoilers and I didn’t want to give too much away with my playlist this time.

Instead of giving you, then, the straight up cinematic soundtrack to the story, scene by scene, I’ve put together the emotional mixed-tape for Walk In The Fire. The music is quite eclectic this go round, but I promise it all makes sense in the end. Here are all the feels; it’s up to you to find the connections. Enjoy.

Clay George - “This Old Town”
Mott The Hoople - “All The Young Dudes”
Chris Isaak - “Don’t Get So Down on Yourself”
The Strokes - “Last Nite”
Deftones - “Knife Party”
The White Stripes - “Blue Orchid”
Nine Inch Nails - “The Perfect Drug”
The Flaming Lips - “Fight Test”
Tiger Army - “Hechizo De Amor”
Beck - “Heavens Hammer”
Tanya Donelly - “Acrobat”
Cat Power - “Werewolf”
Sia - “Elastic Heart”
Red Hot Chili Peppers - “Dani California”
Hank Williams III - “Country Heroes”
Rancid - “Recipe For Hate”
Moby - “When It’s Cold I’d Like to Die”
The Veils - “Sit Down By the Fire”


Steph Post and Walk In The Fire links:

the author's website

Publishers Weekly review
Tampa Bay Times review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Lightwood
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for A Tree Born Crooked
TNBBC's The Next Best Book Blog interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists






January 16, 2018

Shorties (Ocean Vuong Awarded the TS Eliot Prize, Dolores O'Riordan of the Cranberries Passed Away, and more)

Ocean Vuong's poetry collection Night Sky With Exit Wounds has been awarded the TS Eliot prize.


R.I.P., Dolores O'Riordan of the Cranberries.

Stream the band's Tiny Desk Concert.


January is Largehearted Boy's annual fundraiser month. If you enjoy the site and and appreciate the work that goes into it, please consider making a donation.


27 year-end book lists were added to Largehearted Boy’s master aggregation of “best books of 2017” lists yesterday (bringing the total to 1,641), including BookPage's best audiobooks.


Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting 2017 music lists, updated daily.


January's best eBook deals.


The Quietus found gold in David Bowie's non-singles.


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Best of Us by Joyce Maynard


Coming to NYC: an opera based on Fugazi stage banter.


Deadspin interviewed author Ta-Nehisi Coates


Grimes shared a selection of mood playlists.


NPR Books profiled poet Kaveh Akbar.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed musician Damian Krukowski.


Tin House features new Angela Flournoy fiction.


Broadsheet profiled the band Grizzly Bear.


Leni Zumas talked to Weekend Edition about her new novel Red Clocks.


Stream a new tUnE-yArDs song.


Paste listed January's best books.


Salon previewed 2018's most anticipated albums.


The New York Times interviewed author Philip Roth.


Turntable Kitchen shared two tracks from Ava Luna's full album cover of Serge Gainsbourg‘s Histoire de Melody Nelson.


John Rechy talked to the Los Angeles Review of Books about his novel After the Blue Hour.


The Independent profiled the band Django Django.


The New York Review of Books interviewed biographer Robert Caro.


The Creative Independent interviewed Belle and Sebastian's Stuart Murdoch.


Book Riot previewed 2018's best books by British authors.


Aquarium Drunkard shared a compilation of homemade psych music from the '60s and '70s.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


January 15, 2018

"Best Books of 2017" Lists Update - January 15th

For the tenth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find.

As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating regularly.

Please feel free to e-mail me or or contact me on Facebook or Twitter with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online media list I have missed.

See also: Largehearted Boy's List of Essential and Interesting 2017 Year-End Music Lists.

Please consider making a donation or leaving a tip to Largehearted Boy to support the website and posts like these, as well as author playlists, daily book & music news, and much more.


Today's Update to the Online Year-end "Best of 2017" Book Lists:


Adventures in Historyland (top history books)
ainsleyinneverland (top books)
Angelus (top books)
Banner (top books)
Book Pandamonium (best books)
The Book Satchel (favourite books)
BOOKmaddie (best books)
Booknerd Tamj (top books)
BookPage (best audiobooks)
Broke By Books (best books)
Finding the Plot (top books)
The Fun in Reading Books (top books)
The Hobby Whore (best books)
Iowa City Public Library (best books)
James Reads (best books)
Justin Boreta (favorite books)
Kate Forsyth (best books)
Kymberli Briggs (favorite books)
Laura Billett (top books)
Lost in Translation (favorite books)
Louisiana Bride (favorite books)
Lush - Anna James (books)
M. L. S. Weech (top books)
Mountain & Prairie (best books)
Nad's Books (best books)
Nocturnal Book Club (favorite books)
Northern Belle Bookworm (favorite books)
one-part-cynic. more-parts-idealist. (books)
Our Amanahs Our Futures (top books)
Pages and Margins (best books)
A Peculiar Providence (books)
Shannon Reads (favourite books)
Shub's Blog (top books)
Sudbury Star (best books)
This Bites (cookbooks)
When Loose Ends Meet (best books)
Write-Escape (favorite literary fiction)


also at Largehearted Boy:

updates to the lists of "Best Books of 2017" list

Online "Best Books of 2017" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2017 Online Year-end Music Lists
2016 Online Year-end Music Lists
2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


January 12, 2018

Book Notes - Thomas Pierce "The Afterlives"

The Afterlives

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Thomas Pierce's debut novel The Afterlives is an impressive literary ghost story.

Library Journal wrote of the book:

"Pierce has a gift for probing the limits of the psychic realm to uncover the benevolence that manifests from metaphysical insight. Truly remarkable."


In his own words, here is Thomas Pierce's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel The Afterlives:



The Afterlives Mixtape:


Songs full of love & longing & lovely ghosts & ghostly love & the fear of love’s loss & that feeling of gratefulness that sweeps over you when you meet someone who makes your heart beat just a little bit faster.


John Lennon, “Out the Blue”

Impossible to say how many times I listened to this song while writing the book. I love it. The story of John & Yoko--as told via his & her music--is pretty much my favorite love story. I almost used a lyric as an epigraph: Like a UFO you came to me and blew away life’s misery. Really, what’s love if not an unidentified flying object?

Flatt & Scruggs, “Til the End of the World Rolls Round”

A foot-stompin,’ heart-thumpin’ declaration of love that’s conditional, of course, on the earth’s continued existence.

Bjork, “Alarm Call”

Dangerous levels of damn-it-all-joyfulness and exuberance here.

Neko Case, “Buckets of Rain”

I think Neko Case is maybe one of best lyricists alive, and so I feel a little sheepish including her here with a cover song. But as far as I’m concerned, this Bob Dylan tune now belongs to her. Life is sad, life is a bust, all you can do is do what you must. You do what you must do and you do it well. I’ll do it for you, honey baby, can’t you tell?

Paul Bonneau, “Preambule no. 37”

You’re on an old staircase, and a sad-eyed woman passes you going in the opposite direction. When you turn, she’s gone.

Kevin Ayers, “Oh! Wot a Dream”

So my understanding is that Kevin Ayers wrote this song about his friend, Syd Barrett. It’s a pleasant if silly tune. The offer of the “one and only sandwich” to a friend on an afternoon biking trip is so quotidian and offbeat but also so kind-hearted and perfect. Sometimes love isn’t mountain-top grand; it’s just giving up the last spoonful of honey.

Shintaro Sakamoto, “In a Phantom Mood”

I was listening to this song quite a bit in the early days of writing the book. I don’t speak Japanese and had no idea what the lyrics meant until about ten minutes ago when I Googled it. Lo and behold, the chorus resonates with one of the book’s central premises--that we only partly exist, that we are at any given moment both here and not here: Well then, where do I go? Who do I become? In a phantom mood. Well, then, what do I do? Who do I become? With a transparent body.

Loudon Wainwright III, “New Paint”

Whooo I love this song. It’s so sweet--or wait, is it? Quite possibly our narrator is an old dude pining for the glory days, delivering a series of instructions to his younger self on how to behave and treat a beautiful young companion. Somehow love has slipped by him, and he’s wishing he could do it all over again. After all, a woman that kind is hard to find. This is how my narrator Jim feels, I think, when he sees Annie for the first time in years. Life has given him something it almost never does: a do-over.

Gillian Welch, “Paper Wings”

A slow-dance for ghosts. And that guitar solo! Ethereal, lost, a night-drive.

Louis Jordan & His Tympany 5, “Jack, You’re Dead”

If you don’t respond to romance… Jack, you’re dead.

Fleetwood Mac, “Over & Over”

I confess that I’m sort of a latecomer to Fleetwood Mac. You might even say I was a bit of a naysayer. But then I listened to Tusk and was converted. By this song, especially.

Dolly Parton, “The Only Hand You’ll Need to Hold”

Dolly. Enough said.

Alain Goraguer, “Ten Et Tiwa”

A physicist claims she’s built a machine that connects the living and the dead, but your every attempt to track her down is unsuccessful.

John Lennon, “Look At Me”

Another excellent Lennon tune. I’ll be honest, I came pretty close to making this a mixtape of only Lennon songs.

Bobby Charles, “I Must Be in a Good Place Now”

I tell you what: I wouldn’t mind an afterlife built from this song--apple trees in blossom, sunshine, rainbow-colored skies. I’m not sure how this song manages to feel so lackadaisical but also so full-hearted and thankful.

Connie Converse, “How Sad, How Lovely”

The story of Connie Converse is an odd and tragic one. A songwriter in the '50s, she didn’t have much luck selling her music and so moved to Ann Arbor and quit writing and performing. Then one day--this was in the early ‘70s--she disappeared altogether, telling her family in a note she intended to make a new life elsewhere. She was never heard from again! This is perhaps the gloomiest song on the list, but, depending on my mood, I also find it curiously uplifting. Sometimes you just need a sunset at the end of the street to remind you that it’s all worthwhile.

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty, “You Lay So Easy on My Mind”

A slow-dance in a kitchen, for sure.

D’Angelo, “Send It On”
Mazzy Star, “Fade Into You”

I don’t say so in the book, but I’m pretty sure these songs played at the middle school dance where my two main characters--Jim and Annie--once slow-danced together with enough distance between them for a flashlight beam to pass through.

Dennis Wilson, “Thoughts of You”

A sweet song with a (congruously) incongruous left-hand turn to doom & gloom. Wilson is so earnest and on-the-nose here, and I suppose that’s why I like it. Stating the obvious can be a risky move. Makes you vulnerable.

Art Landry, “Dreamy Melody”

This is the only song on this mixtape that actually features in the novel. I’ll set the scene: It’s the 1920, and two newlyweds are dancing in a living room with a small audience of friends and family. The years ahead will not be kind to these two, but for now, in this little living room, they have reason to be hopeful. I’m not sure if there’s such a thing as a ghost-song, but if there is, this one haunts the book.


Thomas Pierce and The Afterlives links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Irish Times review
Minneapolis Star Tribune review
NPR Books review
Salon review
USA Today review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Hall of Small Mammals


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


This Week's Interesting Music Releases - January 12th, 2018

Typhoon

Typhoon's Offerings and Big Star's Live At Lafayette's Music Room are the two albums I can recommend in a skimpy music release week.


This week's interesting music releases:


Anderson East: Encore
Beach Boys: Nassau Coliseum 1974
Big Star: Live At Lafayette's Music Room
Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: Wrong Creatures
Black Veil Brides: Vale
Borns: Blue Madonna
Camila Cabello: Camila
Diana Ross: Diamond Diana: The Legacy Collection
Dirty Sidewalks: Bring Down The House Lights
Durutti Column: The Guitar & Other Machines (remastered and expanded 3-CD box set)
Golden Smog: Weird Tales (reissue) [vinyl]
Joe Satriani: What Happens Next
Michael Hearst: Songs for Extraordinary People [vinyl]
Neil Young: Acoustic Tour 1976
Richard & Linda Thompson: Shoot Out the Lights (reissue) [vinyl]
Rolling Stones: Exile on Main Street (half-speed mastered) (reissue) [vinyl]
Tears for Fears: Rule the World [vinyl]
Typhoon: Offerings
Umphrey's McGee: it's not us
Various Artists: 2018 Grammy Nominees
Various Artists: Call Me By Your Name (soundtrack) [vinyl]
Various Artists: Dr. Demento Covered in Punk
Various Artists: Mambo Americano
Various Artists: Sun Records Does Hank Williams [vinyl]


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)


Atomic Books Comics Preview - January 12, 2018

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Big Me Book

Big Me Book
by Tom Van Deusen

I haven't read such entertaining "autobiographical" comics of character self-assassination since Joe Matt's legendary Peepshow. Van Deusen's art is every bit as likeable as his comic alter-ego isn't. Delightful!


Descender Volume 5: Rise Of The Robots

Descender Volume 5: Rise Of The Robots
by Jeff Lemire / Dustin Nguyen

If you've done all the Star Wars there is to do and you're all caught up on Saga and wondering where to go next, Lemire's Descender offers a surprisingly intimate intergalactic epic about friendship, loyalty, technology and revolution - all told with the incredibly evocative painted art of Nguyen.


Hypercapitalism: The Modern Economy, Its Values, and How to Change Them

Hypercapitalism: The Modern Economy, Its Values, and How to Change Them
by Larry Gonick / Tim Kasser

There are few ways to understand things better than reading one of Larry Gonick's comics explaining concepts or, even better, outlining the Cartoon History Of The Universe. The other day, when I had begun to wonder, "What are we going to do about capitalism? There has to be a way to start fighting back by sabotaging hypercapitalist entities" our shipment of books arrived and in it was this! Talk about your Jungian synchronicity! Gonick and Kasser offer a primer for surviving in a post-Occupy world.


Limbo Lounge

Limbo Lounge
by Dave Calver

The surreal ideas of Jim Woodring meet the otherworldly technique of Renee French in this trippy tale of a purgatory bar.


Spinadoodles 8: Mooz Boosh

Spinadoodles 8: Mooz Boosh
by Sam Spina

Sam's been collecting his diary comics into Spinadoodles for years now. #8 marks the last year of Old Man Spina's twenties - a time when he's hit the big time and has become a filthy rich animator. Will success spoil him? Does success really look like that? Will he age gracefully as his own comic character? Are there farts? Spinadoodles answers all these questions and dozens more you didn't even know you had.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


Shorties (2018's Most Exciting Books, New Music from tUnE-yArDs, and more)

BuzzFeed previewed 2018's most exciting books.


Stream a new tUnE-yArDs song.


January is Largehearted Boy's annual fundraiser month. If you enjoy the site and and appreciate the work that goes into it, please consider making a donation.


27 year-end book lists were added to Largehearted Boy’s master aggregation of “best books of 2017” lists yesterday (bringing the total to 1,614).


Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting 2017 music lists, updated daily.


January's best eBook deals.


Pacific Standard features a new essay by Hanif Abdurraqib about Justin Timberlake.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Astonish Me by Maggie Shipstead

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

& Sons by David Gilbert
Among the Ten Thousand Things by Julia Pierpont
Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue
Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote
The Children Act by Ian McEwan
Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld
The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
Ghettoside by Jill Leovy
Girl at War by Sara Novic
The Girls by Emma Cline
God Help the Child by Toni Morrison
High Dive by Jonathan Lee
The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Some Luck by Jane Smiley
Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
Wild by Cheryl Strayed


Paste previewed 2018's most anticipated albums.


The Rumpus interviewed author Myriam Gurba.


The Record looked back on the "grunge gold rush" of the '90s.


Comics Beat interviewed Box Brown about his new graphic novel Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman.


Stream a new Karen O song.


Words Without Borders interviewed author Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel.


Morning Edition looked back on Johnny Cash's 1968 Folsom Prison performance.


Literary Hub listed 2018's most anticipated crime, mystery, and thriller books.


Book Riot listed 2018's most anticipated books.


Publishers Weekly recommended essential Spanish language female authors.


Stream a new Sylvan Esso song.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Thomas Pierce's novel The Afterlives.


Stream a new Suuns song.


Signature previewed 2018's best science books.


Stream a new Jay Som song.


The New York Times profiled poets Alex Dimitrov and Dorothea Lasky.


Stream a new EMA song.


The Rumpus interviewed author Daniel Olivas.


Stream two new Johanna Warren songs.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


January 11, 2018

Book Notes - Christopher J. Yates "Grist Mill Road"

Grist Mill Road

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Christopher J. Yates's novel Grist Mill Road is a dark and propulsive thriller.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Mesmerizing and impossible to put down, this novel demands full attention, full empathy, and full responsibility; in return it offers poignant insight into human fragility and resilience."


In his own words, here is Christopher J. Yates's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Grist Mill Road:



The story of Grist Mill Road begins in the year 1982. Three teenage friends are running wild in the mountains of upstate New York, when one of them commits a terrible, violent crime with shocking consequences. The plot of the novel shifts between the background to this crime in 1982 and New York City in 2008 and, after we find out what really happened up in those mountains all those years ago, the three former friends come together again, leading to even more devastating results.

I put together this soundtrack for my novel at least a year before I finished Grist Mill Road. Music engages a different-but-parallel part of the brain from writing. As I compiled this playlist I felt like I could see my story from a fascinating new angle. But then again, I used to like making numerous mixtapes on C60 cassettes as a teenager, so perhaps I'm just a playlist kinda guy.


"Girl With One Eye" by Florence and the Machine
Let's kick off with an almost too obvious track. One of the narrators of Grist Mill Road is Hannah, who loses her eye in 1982 after her friend Matthew ties her to a tree and shoots at her forty-nine times with a BB gun, a horrible, graphic crime that occupies the first chapter of the novel. This is a song about revenge, which fits neatly with one of the themes of my novel, and you can hear an almost pure sense of malevolence in Florence Welch's screech as this track rises to its venomous, spiteful crescendo.

"Cookin'" by Clifford Brown
I'm pretty certain the title of this track, penned by jazz saxophonist Lou Donaldson, doesn't refer to making the Sunday gravy, but rather the sense of a jazz ensemble showing off its chops. However, I'm going to take the too-literal approach. Forward wind to 2008 and Patrick, my second narrator is a talented home cook and keen food blogger who feels haunted by his role in what happened up in the mountains in 1982. Clifford Brown is easily my favorite trumpeter—if he hadn't died tragically young, I swear you wouldn't hear Miles Davis mentioned all that much unless people spoke regularly about who was the second best jazz trumpeter to have ever lived. But I'm getting distracted, back to food…

"Eggs and Sausage" by Tom Waits
Now this really is a song about food (not, as with so many ‘food songs', a thinly veiled metaphor for sex). Or should I say, the greatest song about food ever? Although, is there much competition? "Food Glorious Food"? (Cute, but no cigar.) Jack Johnson's "Banana Pancakes"? (Please, save me from his syrup.) Rihanna's "Birthday Cake"? (See "thinly veiled metaphors for sex".) In my novel, after Patrick gets fired from his job, his food obsession/blogging increases, and making dinner for his wife every night serves almost to justify his existence. While Patrick cooks, thinking all the time about the the man who cost him his job, he becomes more and more obsessed with his favorite kitchen knife, "checking the deathly sharpness of its edge until he can almost hear a high-pitched ringing in his ears."

"Don't You Want Me?" by The Human League
Half of Grist Mill Road is set in the early Eighties—or, as it will come to be known in the future, Stranger Things. My three narrators were all at school together in that decade, sexual tension is in the air, British bands were ruling the airwaves… This Human League track is a stone cold classic and came out in the year in which the earlier sections of my novel are set, 1982. Is one of my narrators infatuated with one of the other two? Is that feeling reciprocated? "Don't, don't you want me? You know I don't believe you when you say that you don't need me." From little acorns mighty feelings of vengeance grow.

"Tainted Love" by Soft Cell
Sticking with the 1982 theme, this was the greatest single released that year, no question, no argument, no competition. (Don't you dare come near me with your "Eye of the Tiger" bullshit.) Also, as it happens, Hannah (the girl with one eye) ends up married to Patrick (who witnessed the shooting incident). How? Why? Sounds pretty much like a tainted sort of love, no? All is explained in the novel.

"Into My Arms" by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds
OK, everything has sounded pretty dark so far, but Grist Mill Road is also an unlikely (tainted) love story. And has there ever been a more unlikely opening to a love song than Nick Cave's opening salvo: "I don't believe in an interventionist God / But I know, darling, that you do." Whatever Patrick did or didn't do wrong up in the mountains as a child, in 2008 he is completely, guiltily besotted with Hannah. And if anyone knows a more beautiful and strange love song than this, one of Cave's innumerable masterpieces, then please send me the link right now.

"Just" by Radiohead
Radiohead's lyrics don't always make for easy interpretation, which is only one of the things that makes them unique. To me this is a song about depression or anxiety—"You do it to yourself, you do, and that's what really hurts…"—which is something Patrick suffers from in the novel. From the second verse, the following words could be the refrain of depression personified: "One day I'll get to you, and teach you how to get to purest hell."

"Go Square Go" by Glasvegas
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe there's ever been another song about a schoolyard fight. My two male narrators, Patrick and Matthew, meet and make friends as a result of a lunchtime skirmish after the school bully, known as McMeathead, challenges skinny Patrick to face him behind the bleachers. This incredible, foot-stomping track rises to an anthemic, uplifting, perfectly breathtaking refrain: "Here we, here we, here we, here we, here we, here we fucking go-ohhhhh!" It's enough to make you want to strap on a pair of boxing gloves and get the shit beaten out of you.

"One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer" by John Lee Hooker
Matthew's father is an awful, abusive human being. His favorite way to get drunk, which he does often before taking out his manifold inadequacies on his son, is to sit in a bar and hit up the jukebox with the song, "One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer." He uses this track as a drinking race challenge to fellow barflies—can the other patrons down said tipples, lined up on the bar counter, before he can? Of course, being an awful human being, Matthew's father chooses the white-washing George Thorogood version. Being a slightly less awful human being, I refuse to include that half-assed version on my playlist. The John Lee Hooker recording is the only way to go.

"Feeling Good" by Muse
Grist Mill Road opens with the epigraph, "Scent of the pine, you know how I feel," taken from lyrics to the song "Feelin' Good" (originally written for the musical The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd). If I could somehow make music play when the reader comes to the final page of my novel, this is the song I would choose. There have been so many great versions of this track, but I like the Muse version here for its uplifting, tub-thumping qualities. I think of my novel as a tragedy with a happy ending, and this is the song I imagine playing as Grist Mill Road comes to its tragi-happy conclusion—electric piano, clashing cymbals, falsetto wailing… there's even a megaphone, for chrissakes. Rapturous stuff.


Christopher J. Yates and Grist Mill Road links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
St. Louis Post-Dispatch review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Black Chalk
Literary Hub essay by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - January 11, 2018

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


The World Goes on

The World Goes on
by Laszlo Krasznahorkai

A new book by Booker Prize winner Laszlo Krasznahorkai is always an occasion to celebrate. When you tear yourself away from the prism brilliant cover, you'll find yourself immersed in lasting stories that collect the routines, desires, disappointments, and memories of his faraway characters.


Winter

Winter
by Ali Smith

Following Smith's Autumn is her second seasonal volume of a planned quartet. It's a frosty novel that begins with the sentence "God is dead" and doesn't give a chance for the reader to settle in and get cozy. The story zooms in and out of the lives of a group of inter-generational women.


Women at Work

Women at Work
by The Paris Review

Compiling interviews conducted by the Paris Review with 12 female writers over the course of six decades, this volume is a very special document indeed. Talking about writing process can be boring and repetitive, but these women are eloquent, brilliant, and so completely singular that they leave the reader dazzled, swooning in the dust.


How to Read Nancy

How to Read Nancy
by Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden

Read this book if you want to read the best book about comics, period (to quote The Comics Journal). It isn't just an obsessive book about how to read a single 1959 strip from the classic Nancy newspaper daily, but more broadly about how to read the through the complexities of visual storytelling compacted into such a seemingly simple form.


Witch Wife

Witch Wife
by Kiki Petrosino

Here is an intimate book of poetry about bodies and ghosts - grounded and weightless. Unsettled female bodies turn mystical in imaginings of what is possible.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


Shorties (Chris Ware on His Creative Process, Julien Baker's Tiny Desk Concert, and more)

Cartoonist Chris Ware discussed his creative process with Chicago Magazine.


Julien Baker played a Tiny Desk Concert.


January is Largehearted Boy's annual fundraiser month. If you enjoy the site and and appreciate the work that goes into it, please consider making a donation.


31 year-end book lists were added to Largehearted Boy’s master aggregation of “best books of 2017” lists yesterday (bringing the total to 1,587), including the Oklahoman's favorite books.


Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting 2017 music lists, updated daily.


January's best eBook deals.


NPR Music is streaming the new Bad Plus album, Never Stop II.


Leni Zumas discussed her novel Red Clocks with the Oregonian.


Stream a new Soccer Mommy song.


High Country News examined the continued relevance of Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire fifty years after its publication.


NPR Music is streaming the new Shopping album, The Official Body.


Hermione Hoby explained bow music inspires her writing at Catapult.


Stream a new Son Lux song.


The Boston Review interviewed author China Mieville.


NPR Music is streaming the new album by They Might Be Giants, I Like Fun.


Paste shared an excerpt from Mat Johnson's new comic Incognegro: Renaissance.


Noisey recommended ambient tapes for winter.


The Independent examined the surge in books of song lyrics.


Salon interviewed authors Stefan Merrill Block, Chloe Benjamin, Naima Coster, Jamie Quatro and Nathaniel Rich about their newly published books.


Stream a new Young Galaxy song.


Bookworm interviewed author Chris Kraus.


Stream a new Nap Eyes song.


Signature recommended podcasts for book lovers.


Stream two new Sigur Ros songs.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Colin Winnette’s novel, The Job of the Wasp.


Stream a new song by Liima (which features the members of Efterklang) .


Neel Mukherjee: discussed his novel A State of Freedom with Literary Hub.


Stream a new U.S. Girls song.


The New Yorker shared an excerpt from Michelle McNamara's book I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer.


Stream a new song by Anna Meredith.


The Creative Independent interviewed writer and translator John Keene.


Stream a new Loma song.


Outside recommended women authors who write about the wild.


Aquarium Drunkard shared three cover songs by the band Sunwatchers.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


January 10, 2018

Book Notes - Alan Michael Parker "Christmas in July"

Christmas in July

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alan Michael Parker's novel Christmas in July is imaginatively told by ten different narrators.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"A complex, absorbing, and occasionally moving read."


In his own words, here is Alan Michael Parker's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Christmas in July:



Music nearly killed me in 2015 and 2016. When writing my new novel, Christmas in July, I needed my favorite tunes for my own edification and entertainment and pleasure, my writing music, at the same time as I needed to learn the music of my characters, most of whom I liked but with whom I share so little taste. In writing a novel narrated by ten different narrators of varying stripes, plaids, and sizes—through which a thirteen-year-old girl dying of cancer moves unpredictably, the most important character of all—taste could not be mine. Taste had to be learned. So how to listen to the songs in someone else’s head, tunes I might even loathe? Geez, Louise, as I tend to say.

What songs matter to me, inspire or calm me, or allow me to jump about in my imagination as I pogo in my living room, barked at by my dogs? Such a playlist seems relatively easy to identify: here’s my iPod, press SHUFFLE. What songs matter to an anxious street kid who feels responsible for the death of her former landlord; or a forty-two year-old, newly divorced expert on The Wizard of Oz; or a twenty-six year-old MiniMart manager devoted to MineCraft and revenge fantasies? These are a few of my ten people, my projections, my faltered egos. How can I stand to listen to their terrible music—in the same way I can stand to love them, as their author and benefactor and second-harshest critic?

Also, it’s fiction. As a novelist, no matter that I want my stories to read true, I tend to invent the worlds my characters occupy, both interior and exterior: the town in which my novel’s mostly set, for example, is an invention; the cult that we encounter twice is an invention, if not perilously close to reality, as it turns out. There’s a fictional music festival in the novel, the line-up featuring six fictional bands (although one of them apparently played SXSW, if not a fictional version of SXSW). Do I need to know all the lyrics of all of the songs by all of the bands I made up? Maybe one of the goals in writing fiction is not to know everything about your characters on the front end, to learn from them as you go. And then there are aspects of them I know well, to which they’re not privy, via dramatic irony. I believe, for example, that Evie should get over her love of Suptertramp, as it’s in the way of her coming out. Evie isn’t so sure.

Then there’s the question of syntax and music, and the relationship between the two in Christmas in July. I write a lot of poetry, and the sounds of language matter to me; I scan sentences for metrical effects, hear iambs in everyday dialogue. I am a constant victim of syntax: it moves me despite myself. But of course a novel isn’t a poem, and the sounds of prose—its music—must be heard as a function of the art form, the long breathing of a novel specific to that book’s life, and the shorter bursts of music in scene and dialogue and exposition specific to the demands of prose. Times ten: ten stories, each told differently, each in a different register. Added to this dilemma is Christmas herself, my protagonist, whose literal voice needs to be consistent throughout, her situation sad (she’s dying) without being saccharine (I want to feel, and want my reader to feel, but neither of us appreciates being emoted upon). The music of the words needs to exist independent of any literal music the characters might cherish.

So here we go, ten songs, nine of which exist; some are mine, some are theirs, some are waiting to be written and recorded by the The Decemberists, and all are with my compliments. And for those of you reading the novel, my thanks, I hope you like it—and please note that the ten songs below correspond in order to the ten stories that constitute Christmas in July.


Otis Redding, “The Happy Song (Dum-Dum-De-De-De-Dum-Dum)”

What’s the R&B anthem for the first beer on a hot July evening, the kids chasing one another in the back yard, Spotify cranked past distortion, the windows open and the box fans set to crazy? You’re in your housedress, you’re alone and shaking your thing, the sad husband has finally moved on, your lover’s yet to arrive, and the light goes golden…. To me, and to Angela, the middle-school registrar who narrates the opening story, “Hello. This Is Your Mother.,” the singer has to be Otis Redding. That he was one of the sexiest men to sing matters to Angela; that he died young matters to me.

D’Banj, “If U Dey Crase (featuring K-Switch)”

“War,” the second story in the novel, is set in a hardware store and narrated by a long-time employee, a widower who’s a Civil War buff, and who doesn’t like to talk. Richie is at his register when Christmas arrives; meanwhile, snacking in the break room at the back of the store, a young employee, an African immigrant named Hakim, munches Cheez Doodles, crumbs on his vest. Something bad may well happen. “If U Dey Crase (featuring K-Switch)” is one of Hakim’s favorite songs. In this track, the ubiquitous D’Banj, Fela’s protegée, features his own younger brother, K-Switch, in a zippy dance ditty. I like it too.

Grimes, “Kill V. Maim”

Nineteen-year-old Sarah Wasserman, a.k.a. “Nerd-Ass,” has been living on the streets for three years. She’s removed from schoolgirl culture, never to partake in the kinds of earbud-sharing bartered commerce that teen girls deploy to define their circles of taste. But “Grimes” is a musician Nerd-Ass has heard, and understands, and “Kill V. Maim” has just the kind of smart style to speak to this street kid. It helps that Grimes “is a real kick-drum person,” (and reports in the same interview that “Kill V. Maim” was written to be a mixture of The Godfather: Part II and Twilight), not that Nerd-Ass would let herself care too much about any of that. Not caring is a thing she’s practicing.

D’Angelo and The Vanguard, “Sugah Daddy”

Oh my god, what a song. My narrator, Markus, waited fourteen years for D’Angelo to make another record, and this track alone justifies the wait. Check out the version on YouTube, live at the North Sea Jazz Festival in Rotterdam in 2015: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmC-aT0Xe9k. “Sugah Daddy” is a snazzy tapestry of big band, hip-hop, Tower of Power, and D’Angelo’s smooth. I also recommend groove-cooking to “Sugah Daddy”—a term you’ve heard here first, “groove-cooking”—which is what Markus does toward the end of “My Beauty,” serving up a little pasta.

Johnny Cash & June Carter Cash, “Jackson”

Grandmother, softball aficionado, and busybody Meg of “Meg’s Team” claims that she’s an artist, and on occasion, she’s right. She sees the world differently, that’s for sure, and her maternal response to Christmas allows the young teen to express some of her accumulated pain. Meg is also a Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash fan, and she especially loves June’s growling rejoinders in “Jackson,” the classic that begins with the hollered lines, “We got married in a fever / hotter than a pepper sprout.” Not surprisingly, so did Meg, pregnant at eighteen. Also not surprisingly, as the song goes, pushy Meg’s ambitions include to “teach ‘em what they don’t know how.”

The Flaming Lips, “Any Colour You Like”

This one’s mine. Little Sammy, who tells our tale in “Fireworks,” has to be a Pink Floyd fan. But I like this cover version more.

Judy Garland, “Over the Rainbow”

Dorothy Kim, the narrator of this story, is an expert on The Wizard of Oz. Named after Dorothy Gayle, an orphan herself raised by an aunt and uncle, our Dorothy has a dream of a place somewhere—and so she builds a website, www.deardorothy.com, to monetize her mastery of the film’s trivia. But she’s a person of opinions, and of substance (to her surprise), and despite a fanatical relationship to the movie, she actually prefers Judy Garland’s 1943 rendition of “Over the Rainbow” to the film version. Here, performing on Bob Hope’s “Strictly G.I.” show as part of the Command Performance U.S.A. series, Garland’s alto has matured, five years after recording the film score; there’s a darker timbre (the vocal chords thicken as we age), and the quality of what the singers call “underpinning” is noticeably different. Garland’s little lisped attack—prominent in the film version—seems to have been schooled out, here, too although that Mid-Atlantic accent persists in her vowels. You might not agree: perhaps the film’s version is the only one for you. Notwithstanding, Dorothy the narrator favors Garland the singer’s rendition for the troops, and I couldn’t agree more. The number begins at the 8:00 minute mark.

Brian Eno, “I’ll Come Running”

The most eccentric of my narrators—that’s saying a lot—may be Snow Joe, the bee keeping hermit who gives us “Blue the Dog.” Committed to a life of purity, and to prevent the “reabsorption” of his body’s toxins, Snow Joe lives alone in the woods, where he meets Christmas, who shows up one day in a heap of sick. His companion, Blue the Dog, finds the dying girl: Blue the Dog chooses Christmas for a friend, and brings the two mismatched characters together. There’s grace in Snow Joe, and fear; there’s fear in Christmas, and grace. My song for Snow Joe, and for the oddity of this friendship, is “I’ll Come Running,” from Eno’s 1975 classic, Another Green World, a lyrical enigma elevated by a spectacular Robert Fripp solo. For an excellent take on that astonishing album, here’s Mike Powell, writing in Pitchfork.

The Sad Huns, “Leif, Leif, Ericson”

At the first annual GlitterFest in Saxon Hills, Maryland, in the novel Christmas in July, a band named “The Sad Huns” debuts what will certainly be their hit single, “Leif, Leif Ericson.” Fortunately, the narrator of that moment, Evie Glitter, films the performance. Here are the lyrics:

I want to be discovered oh
floating on the ice oooh
I’m floating on the ice
and you’re not here
oh, oh, oh

bang the bones on the bow
bang, bang, bang
uh, uh

Leif, Leif Ericson
no one can remember
when you and I were lovers
in Greenland

in Greenland
in Greenland

bang the bones on the bow
bang, bang, bang
uh, uh

Seal meat, whale meat, woman, man
Leif, Leif Ericson
no one can remember
when you and I were lovers
in Greenland

bang, bang, bang
uh, uh

Seal meat, whale meat, woman, man
Leif, Leif Ericson
no one can remember
no one can remember
no one can remember


Dark Dark Dark, “Daydreaming”

I want Nikki Danzig, the narrator of my novel’s final story, to have encountered the band Dark Dark Dark by chance in 2008, when she still lived in New York. Here came the band, collaborating with the street artist Swoon, on a flotilla of seven hand-made rafts sailed down the Hudson River from Troy, New York, to Long Island City, a project called, “Swimming Cities of the Switchback Sea.” I see Nikki—the novel’s Aunt Nikki—standing on a pier and watching the rafts float by like her own memories. That encounter would have inspired profound affection for the band’s music, naturally, and for the deep sadness she owns when listening to their best-known track, “Daydreaming,” a song Nikki can hear once Christmas has gone, and I can still hear, even now that my novel has ended.

With thanks to Tevi Eber, Jeff Jackson, Felicia van Bork, and Michael Waters, for their professional assistance.


Alan Michael Parker and Christmas in July links:

Kirkus review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


"Best Books of 2017" Lists Update - January 10th

For the tenth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find.

As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating regularly.

Please feel free to e-mail me or or contact me on Facebook or Twitter with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online media list I have missed.

See also: Largehearted Boy's List of Essential and Interesting 2017 Year-End Music Lists.

Please consider making a donation or leaving a tip to Largehearted Boy to support the website and posts like these, as well as author playlists, daily book & music news, and much more.


Today's Update to the Online Year-end "Best of 2017" Book Lists:


Amaysn Reads (favorite books)
Arts on the AU (favorite books)
Book Realm (top YA/fantasy books)
The Bookish Wanderer (top books)
caseysbooks (favourite books)
FiftyShadesOfBooksSite (top books)
heidithedreamer (favorite books)
Hot 104.7 (best books)
In the Haven of Our Home (best books)
Jeff Gravens (favorite books)
Lisa Writes... (favorite books)
Misadventures of an INFP (best books)
Morganton News Herald (top books)
P. S. Hoffman (best science fiction books)
PhD Talk (best books)
Positive Email Results (top small business books)
Pretty Mess Reading (favorite books)
Salisbury Post (best young adult and memoirs)
SAPL Reader's Blog (favorite books)
SFF Book Reviews (top books)
Shades of Paper (best contemporary books)
Taylor Is Reading (best books)
Tea or Wine (favorite books)
Thoughts on Fantasy (best science fiction and fantasy books)
To Spend and Waste Time (best books)
Totally Bookish (favorite books)
A Writer Called Marie (favorite books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

updates to the lists of "Best Books of 2017" list

Online "Best Books of 2017" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2017 Online Year-end Music Lists
2016 Online Year-end Music Lists
2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


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